Blog

 

Stupid Medical News

Tuesday, May 15, 2012 // Uncategorized

OK.  Maybe that is too strong a term, but I read a lot of medical journals and these struck me as humorous.

This appears to come from the same people who advise you to take off your eyeglasses and assume the position when the airplane is crashing.

‘Toto, I’ve a Feeling You Should Be Wearing a Helmet’ — CDC Offers Tornado Advice
Wearing a helmet during a tornado may help protect a person’s head, but seeking shelter during an approaching storm is still the best way to stay safe, according to a CDC statement released Thursday.
The statement, which seems to have been issued after National Public Radio attempted to get a comment on the topic, observes that storm-related head injuries cause many deaths and that people “may decide to use helmets to protect their heads.”
The statement continues: “Looking for a helmet in the few seconds before a tornado hits may delay you getting safely to shelter. For those who choose to use helmets, these helmets should not be considered an alternative to seeking appropriate shelter. Rather, helmets should be considered just one part of their overall home tornado preparedness kit to avoid any delay.”

Here is the CDC’s advice.

Media Statement

 

For Immediate Release: May 3, 2012
Contact :CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

CDC Statement on Helmets and Tornadoes

<!–

Main sources of sodium include many common foods

–>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend, as its first recommendation, that people in the path of a tornado find a shelter or a tornado-safe room. The safest place in the home is the interior part of a basement. If possible, get under something sturdy such as a heavy table or workbench.  If outdoors, lie down in a gully or ditch.

We understand that people who have seen the tragedy that tornadoes can impose are looking for any useful and effective ways to protect themselves. We don’t have research on the effectiveness of helmet use to prevent head injuries during a tornado, but we do know that head injuries are common causes of death during tornadoes, and we have long made the recommendation that people try to protect their heads.  Individuals may decide to use helmets to protect their heads. However, because the time to react may be very short, people who choose to use helmets should know where they are and have them readily accessible.  Looking for a helmet in the few seconds before a tornado hits may delay you getting safely to shelter.  For those who choose to use helmets, these helmets should not be considered an alternative to seeking appropriate shelter. Rather, helmets should be considered just one part of their overall home tornado preparedness kit to avoid any delay.

CDC continues to promote protective measures for use during natural disasters including tornadoes.  For more detailed information, go to http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/tornadoes/during.asp.

###
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICESExternal Web Site Icon

DUH?  DID THEY REALLY NEED TO TELL US THIS? IS IT SAFER THAN TEXTING?

Marijuana and Driving Don’t Mix

Acute cannabis use raises risk for motor vehicle accidents.

In laboratory and simulator settings, cannabis consumption impairs driving skills, but whether the same is true for real-world driving is unclear. In this meta-analysis of nine observational studies involving more than 49,000 participants, investigators examined whether acute cannabis consumption (determined by toxicologic analysis of whole blood or by self-report) raises risk for motor vehicle accidents (MVAs).

Driving under the influence of cannabis was associated with significantly higher risk for MVAs (odds ratio, 1.9) than was unimpaired driving. Similar results were obtained for analyses involving only case-control studies (OR, 2.8); culpability studies, which consider driver responsibility for MVAs (OR, 1.7); and studies of fatal MVAs (OR, 2.1).

Comment: Unsurprisingly, acute cannabis consumption substantially raises risk for motor vehicle accidents, whether fatal or not.

Paul S. Mueller, MD, MPH, FACP

Published in Journal Watch General Medicine February 16, 2012

Citation(s):

Asbridge M et al. Acute cannabis consumption and motor vehicle collision risk: Systematic review of observational studies and meta-analysis. BMJ 2012 Feb 9; 344:e536. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e536)

0 Comments
 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *